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20121201
20121231
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cities, 681 villages, and more than 1300 townships. ohio is called the mother of presidents. it is the home of eight great ohioans who have become president of these united states -- presidents william henry harrison, benjamin harrison, william mckinley, william howard taft, james abrams garfield, warren harding, ulysses s. grant, and rutherford hayes. it is my pleasure today to state that today ohio's electoral college members will cast their votes to elect president barack obama. the united states constitution, federal law, and ohio law all have called on this group of individuals who will organize themselves as the ohio elector college, according to the ohio revised code. it specifies the secretary of state shall convene the electoral college. so i will now pass the gavel back to the secretary of state, secretary jon husted. >> thank you, congresswoman- elect beatty. one of the traditions of democracy is the orderly transition of power, or in this case, the retention of it. this orderly transition of power, particularly as it relates to the power of the presidency, makes
crime cities in the country. but i never hear anything about it. the only thing i hear is every time something happens to a white kid. its national news, it's big news. let's talk about all kids, not just the white kids. host: a tweet -- let's hear more from the commander-in-chief in newtown, connecticut, yesterday addressing the cause of what happened on friday. [video clip] >> these tragedies must end. to end them, we must change. we will be told that the causes of such violence are complex and that's true. no single law or set of laws can eliminate people from the world or prevent every senseless acts of violence in our society. but that cannot be an excuse for inaction. surely we can do better than this. if there is even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town from the grief that visited tucson and aurora and oak creek and newtown, and communities from t communitieso blacksburg before that, surely we have an obligation to try. host: that was president obama speaking last night. we're asking whether you think u.s. gun laws should change. here's
. if you are in new york city, schoolteachers and firemen make $100,000 a year and they are easily in households the approach the limit. it depends and where you live. among high-income people, there is a wide range of what people pay in taxes. if you're a lawyer in washington, i find them to be reasonable people who work long hours. you are probably paying 28%. if you are on wall street and you are well-connected if you have a capacity to have your income defined as investment as opposed to salary even though it is indeed salary income. if you are somebody like jamie dimon or warren buffet, you can get away with 14% tax. the real problem with upper individuals are not the people who pay the taxes we intend for the to pay, but all the people who get away without paying any taxes at all. those tax breaks and write offs are derived by the president and by democrats, but they never seem to get fixed. one reason is republicans do not want them fixed. and the other hand, the democrats get a lot of campaign contributions from wall street. that is a real problem on both sides of the aisle
at the literary life of new york's capital city, albany. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span 3. >> house speaker john boehner told reporters the white house has wasted another week in negotiations of the fiscal cliff. this is about five minutes. >> good morning. this is not a progress report. there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. 8 days ago, secretary geithner came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on. it had more stimulus spending than it had in cuts and an infinite increase in the death lemmas like forever. four days ago we offered a serious proposal. since then, there has been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president thought the tax rate hikes he wanted, we wou
sm. host: joining us from new york city this morning, mr. fund, i just want to begin, if we could, actually, with the front page of "the washington post." in the news that president obama is looking at proposals on guns. obama asked his cabinet members for ideas to curb violence. what do you make of that? guest: well, we've been this way before. in 1994, president clinton signed an assault weapons ban into law. it expired in 2004. so we have 10 years of experience of what that ban did. and frankly, a university of pennsylvania study looked at all of that said that while there was some slight decrease in the use of assault weapons, it did nothing for overall gun violence. assault weapons, semi-automatics are used between 2% and 8% of crimes and it said the gun ban did nothing to reduce the overall level of gun violence in this country. look, i mean, this is a very tragic situation. and it's a very emotional one. it's at least an emotional issue as abortion or the death penalty. and emotions run high here. and we have a very deeply divided country. we have a large chunk of the count
was 15 at charlie square in salt lake city. >> i'm carolyn tuft, my daughter kirsten was killed in salt lake city. and i was also seriously injured in 2007. >> my name is peter reed, i'm here, again, as i was in april, because of my daughter, mary. she was shot and killed in her french class on the campus of virginia tech on april 16, 2007. >> my name is casey, my little brother, derrek was riddled with bullets on september 8, 2001 new york sacramento, california. -- in sacramento, california. >> my name is paul mauser, i'm the father of paul maus -- of daniel mauser who was killed in the massacre at columbine high school. >> my name is paul wilson. my beautiful wife christy lyn wilson, 26 years, was cowardly shot and killed in california, onth 12, 2011. -- october 12, 2011. >> i'm andre, i am father of bear. my son miraculously survived the shooting, he was in the line of fire. i am here not to represent the entire town, i am here just on my own accord. >> obviously the town that andre is talking about is newtown, connecticut. before we begin, is there anybody else here who has a story
. >> so you have lived in new york city. you went to colgate, which is upstate new york. you went to harvard, lived in boston. now you live in connecticut. do they care this much about history? >> they do. i gave a talk in madison conn a week ago. they are very interested and enthusiastic. in new england, 1775 -- in the south, only south carolina and virginia were doing anything of any importance in 1775. north carolina was too divided and georgia did not matter much. but new england was out in front. the british knew that big trouble was coming out of new england. >> why? what was the reason that the patriots wanted to be separated from great britain? >> you have to take it in layers. the underlying population in new england tended to come in the beginning from east anglia, which was the old section of england that was the most against the crown and found no support for the parliamentary side in the civil war. after parliament triumphs but loses in the restoration. you see so many names of towns in eastern massachusetts that are also the names of towns in east anglia. so they hav
in a very densely populated region of new york city, long island, and the southern portions of new york state. and so i think it's a stark reminder, a very real example, a very painful outcome that speaks to the need of investing, investing in our infrastructure. and so as we go forward there's also an opportunity to improve upon what existed at the time of these storms. for instance, in the energy networks, utility networks, we can do state of the art. we have taught other nations how to build those systems. it's time to do nation building at home. and i think the beauty here is that while we invest in transportation and other infrastructure, energy infrastructure and water systems and treatment centers and treatment systems and public schools, what we're doing is rippling into the benefits of efficiency, of public safety, of employment and economic development. that is a positive series of dynamics that then lifts the economy and provides for work. 90% of the jobs, it's projected, that come from this sort of infrastructure investment are speaking to middle income households. jobs that
parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. rauf would read -- mrs. roth would read the newspaper and the about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york'. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughn
: you live in new york city. what you think about mayor bloomberg and his opinion on the gun issue? caller code generally what mort zuckerman was talking about -- caller code generally put more zuckerman was talking about, how many times has he been caught at -- stopped and frisked on the street on his way to an important meeting? now they want to go through his pockets? he thinks that stop and frisk is ok? i will take my chances with the people in my community rather than a police organization pulling me over and the time they feel like it. host of this, and comes to us from facebook. a few of our viewers and listeners are listening -- to hang in. host: our next caller is an independent in the vienna. caller: my comment, and it is not probably going to be popular, but my stance is that ever since the schools became drug free, more drugs than ever have been handed out to kids. the principal and the nurse in the school, whether it is packs all, ritalin, whatever. find a school shooting that did not have something to do with a kid raised on these drugs. you cannot find them. i promis
the other side of this case. host: you represent a very urban area? tesco i have nothing outside the city limits of louisville -- calleguest: i have nothing outse the city limits of louisville. as a kid, i went to summer camp and got my certificate of sharpshooting. i always thought guns or something the good guys used to ward off the bad guys bending most frequently, guns are used -- when they are in society, they are used by bad guys. i have always been afraid of them. i live in a community where there are more people who are afraid of them because they have direct contact with them on an almost daily basis. that fear i think gives me a right to be free to go to a grocery, theater, or a mall without having to carry a gun to protect myself. host: if you were in a different district in kentucky, with your position be a political death wish in a sense? guest: there is a good chance it would be. my colleague who lost this year represented the lexington area and always felt without a rating from the nra, he could not survive. he fel ttha tway and i suspect many of the other districts in kent
according to a new survey. -- report. >> this weekend on c-span 3, the city prepares to mark the dropping of the atomic bomb in 1945. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. i do not want to argue. i think we are past that. my whole purpose for being here is to honor the dead and listen to to to accommodate what i can to say this as the happen again. >> we will be joined in washington to discuss meetings. >> the members of congress were told -- the committee also heard from advocacy groups in this hearing. >> the committee on oversight and government reform will come to order. this hearing on 1 in 88 children looks into the federal response of rising rates will come to order. americans have the right to know the money washingotn takes from them is well-spent. americans deserve an effective and efficient government that works for them. our duty is to protect these rights. our solemn obligation is to hold government accountable to taxpayers because taxpayers have a right to know what they get from their government. we worked tirelessly with citizen watchdogs to bring genuine refor
, the citizens from 241 cities, 681 villages, and more than 1300 townships. ohio is called the mother of presidents. it is the home of eight great ohioans who have become president of these united states. president william henry harrison, benjamin harrison, william mckinley, william howard taft, james abrams garfield, warren harding, u.s. grant, and rutherford hayes. it is my pleasure today to state that today ohio's ohio electoral college members will cast their votes to elect president barack obama. the united states constitution federal law and ohio law all recalled this group as individuals who will organize themselves as the ohio college of electoral, according to the ohio revised code. it specifies the secretary of state shall convene the electoral college. so i will now pass the gavel back to the secretary of state, n hustend.john jews d -- husted. >> thank you, congresswoman- elect beatty. one of the traditions of democracy is the orderly transition of power, or in this case, the retention of its. this orderly transition of power, particularly as it relates to the power of the
are sure it is a city with a decline in property value and losing the home, it is not really tax evasion. why did they do it for five years? we have a political department that might be better at answering that. host: what was the housing market like in the 2007? make a comparison of what was going on in 2007 and what is happening now. guest: it was beginning to tank. values peaked around 2006 and in some places 2007. it is the year we began to see the foreclosures and the problems with a sub prime mortgages. the context was, we were not in a recession yet. it was not like 2007 -- 2008 when everyone had a problem. in 2007 it was clear there were going to be a lot of defaults and this was potentially a problem. this tool can be an efficient way of handling what would otherwise be expensive foreclosures. host: we want to make sure the viewers understand what we are talking about with regard to eligible homeowners who can use the mortgage debt relief act of 2007. the bank waives the portion of the balance they did not recoup in foreclosure, this goes into effect. the numbers are there on th
time. i worked in new york city for about 28 years as a bilingual teacher and a certified credit counselor. if i could just give my personal testimony, i think you may be relevant to the issue here. i studied at hunter city college in new york for a master's degree in counseling. a masters degree, at that time, acquired only 30 credits -- graduate credits. i was in the last class that certified the 30 credits and afterwards it became 38 and now i believe it is 60. my training, i thought, was quite good. we had very experienced and talented professors. the objective was to put on the front lines some trained people to basically just be listening. to have the children referred to us and we have enough training to we could try to help them, or if we felt that the problem was severe enough, we could refer them. we had psychiatrists in new york available. school support teams. and i am now working in florida as is an adjunct professor at the college level. and my feeling is come, and i don't want to be too judgmental, but i think at the community college level and maybe colleges in ge
city, albany, saturday and noon eastern on c-span 2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on cspan 3. up next, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined by former obama administers an adviser on iran to discusses the iranian nuclear program. and the foundation for the defense of democracies, this is one hour. >> good morning, it is a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. i want to quickly set the stage -- i don't need to tell anyone in this room about the death of the problem of human rights abuses in iran. i would just read briefly from the report that the u.n. special wrote and file to the u.n. general assembly in september of 2011 when there was a pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations special reperteur on human rights. in september, 2011, the un secretary-general submitted a report to the general assembly in which he said he was "deeply troubled by reports of increased numbers of executions, amputations, arbitrary arrests and detentions, unfair trials, torture, and
the history of new york city, albany. next, a discussion on the impact of the so-called fiscal cliff on unemployment insurance. then a forum on skilled immigrant labor and the american economy. after that, speaker john boehner and representative pelosi on the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine, but we have not coordinated care and all of the services that we have end up having cracks that they are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. you need to step back and ask -- are we hurting people overall on a global level? what are we doing sometimes? now we have the institute of medicine report to think. 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in healthcare? 30% of the medications that we describe? the procedures? this is something that is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. healthcare industry. dr. marty makary on his book " unaccountable." on c-span 2. >> it is estimated that it would cost -- [indiscernible] [bells ringing] >> i chose to honor both. the sacrifice of american se
of the way things typically are, where it is a particular state or parke -- particular state or city looking for that. we have seen there is enough interest at 13 partnerships would apply for that. that shows the promise of the strategy, which has been used in germany, of the national manufacturing innovation hubs. that is something we will to promote in a second term and expand further. >> over here. >> thank you. every child matters. i applaud you for your comments about the need not to have less having money for children versus money for research and other vital needs in the domestic discretionary budget. the question is, where do we find more revenue? and have you considered taxes on stock transfers and stock transactions or other kinds of innovative -- carbon taxes, other kinds of approaches where we can find new revenue that it would be possible for us to have amongst ourselves for important resources? >> it is going to shock you to know that i'm not here to make news on a new revenues. [laughter] we are busy fighting right now to make sure that we have a budget agreement that is very
cable satellite corp. 2012] >> explore the history and literary culture of new york's capitol city albany. this week on "book tv" and american history tv. up next on c-span, shaun donovan discusses the finances of the federal housing administration. then the senate debate on that debt ceiling. followed by the joint economic committee hearing on the so- called fiscal cliff. >> extended unemployment benefits for workers who have been jobless for more than 26 weeks expire in january. the exploration -- the expiration is part of fiscal cliff. on "washington journal", we will look at the expiring unemployment benefits. then our roundtable with michael tanner of the cato institute. "washington journal" is live every day on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the chief of staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated the land on -- would cost 250,000 of our men, and 500,000 on -- >> as harry truman's grandson, i have to choose to honor -- the sacrifice and the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific a
an office and his city goes a long way. -- and authenticity goes a long way. this message of conservatism will reach the end of this nation in a positive way. i look forward to having an opportunity to think of a message as a have been. >> [no microphone] >> remember this humble moment. >[laughter] >> what does this mean for you personally? >> 18 years ago the citizens of charleston county give me an opportunity to represent them based on values and issues. a couple years later the folks in the state house seats in an opportunity to represent their issues and values. a few years ago they give me an opportunity to represent their issues in value. i'm not ever really heard, besides the fact or because you are black, here's what we want to do. it is about values and issues. it speaks to the issue of south carolina and our nation. it speaks to the heart of the good people of our nation and state. more importantly than the complexion i have, that it is more important bring up in a single household. it did not give up on your kids. it may be tough. it all may be challenging. all things may be t
of new york's capital city, albany, saturday on "poke t.d.." -- "book tv." >> in a few
city, saturday at noon eastern. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy and with the greatest threat to economic -- says the greatest threat to economic security is dependent on foreign oil. they are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production and improving conservation, to reduce revenue and decrease our debt. >> good evening. we are nothing without their credibility as the great ceo's and leaders of our time i want to give of thanks to the staff. we stand on their shoulders and the hard work and time they spent with the leadership council, the policies staff to put these events together, our public local staff we did our political staff and the rest. we are seeing more production than we have seen before. the last couple decades of year on year growth. the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons, yet we continue to have a problem. i think the report we are , its subtitley compan says it all, are missing american resources. how do we leverage the abundance we have in the united states to our maximu
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